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KINGDOM OF ISRAEL


  • Jeroboam, the First King. During Solomon's building operations He discovered a young man by the name of Jeroboam, the son of Nebat an Ephrathite, who was valorous and industrious, and he set him over the Charge of the house of Joseph (1 Kings 11:26-29). Subsequently as the young man was going out of Jerusalem, he was met by the prophet Ahijah Who, in a very impressive manner, assured him that he should reign over Ten of the tribes of Israel (1 Kings 11:29-39). Solomon on hearing of this attempted to kill Jeroboam, and for protection he fled to Egypt (1 Kings 11:40). Upon the accession of Rehoboam to the throne the people sent for Jeroboam, and he joined his countrymen in requesting the new King to lighten their burdens which he emphatically refused to Do, and Jeroboam led the revolt (1 Kings 11:1-24; 1 Chronicles 10:1-19). Jeroboam established himself at Shechem in Mount Ephraim, and in order to Prevent the people from going to Jerusalem to worship, set up two Golden calves, one at Bethel and the other at Dan, assuring the people That these were the gods that had brought them out of the land of Egypt (1 Kings 12:25-30). He also disregarded the law of God and made priests of the lowest of the people, and changed the time of holding the annual Feasts ordained by Moses (1 Kings 12:31-33). During these perilous times a prophet of the Lord from Judah went to Bethel and found Jeroboam Officiating at the altar. The prophet cried vehemently against the Altar and predicted that a child should be born to the house of David, Josiah by name, who would destroy the priests of this altar on account Of their sacrilegious work, and emphasized the authenticity of his Commission by causing the altar to open and the ashes to pour out. Jeroboam was greatly angered and attempted to arrest the man of God With disastrous results, but through the intercession of the prophet he Was restored (1 Kings 13:1-32). After this Jeroboam increased in wickedness (1 Kings 13:33-34). Jeroboam's son Abijah fell sick, and he sent his wife to Shiloh to interview the prophet Ahijah in order to Find out the destiny of the child. He told her that the child would Die, and predicted the extinction of Jeroboam's house on account of his Unparalleled wickedness (1 Kings 14:1-18). Jeroboam reigned twenty-two years (1 Kings 14:19-20). He reigned contemporaneously with Rehoboam seventeen years (1 Kings 12:1-20; 14:20; 2 Chronicles 14:20), Abijah three years (1 Kings 14:31-15:2), and with Asa two years (1 Kings 14:20,31; 15:1,2,8-10; 2 Chronicles 12:13).
  • Ahijah the Prophet. The prophet Ahijah flourished during the Reign of Jeroboam (1 Kings 14:1-18).
  • Nadab, the Second King. Jeroboam was succeeded by his son Nadab, Whose uneventful reign continued only two years (1 Kings 15:25).
  • Baasha, the Third King--Second Dynasty. Nadab was overthrown and Succeeded by Baasha, who, as soon as he reached the throne, Exterminated the house of Jeroboam because of his extreme wickedness (1 Kings 15:2-30). Baasha walked in the footsteps of Jeroboam (1 Kings 15:34). He was visited by the prophet of the Lord who predicted the destruction of his house on account of his sins (1 Kings 16:1-7). Baasha reigned over all Israel twenty-four years (1 Kings 15:34). He reigned contemporaneously with Asa (1 Kings 15:9-10,33).
  • Jehu the Prophet. The prophet Jehu flourished during the reign Of Baasha (1 Kings 16:1-4).
  • Elah, the Fourth King. Baasha was succeeded by his son Elah, who Reigned two years contemporaneously with Asa, king of Judah (1 Kings 15:9-10; 16:6-8).
  • Zimri, the Fifth King--Third Dynasty. Elah was assassinated by His servant Zimri who, as soon as he ascended the throne, destroyed all The house of Baasha according to the word of the Lord. Zimri reigned Contemporaneously with Asa seven days (1 Kings 15:9-10; 16:8-30).
  • Omri, the Sixth King--Fourth Dynasty. Zimri was succeeded by Omri. He reigned six years in undisputed authority. He was contemporary With Asa (1 Kings 15:9-10; 16:21-23). The chief act of Omri's reign, was the founding of the city of Samaria (1 Kings 16:23-24). His reign was characterized by evil (1 Kings 16:25-27).
  • Ahab, the Seventh King. Omri was succeeded by his son Ahab (1 Kings 16:28). He introduced idolatry into the court of Israel, and his reign was distinguished by its remarkable disregard for the law of God (1 Kings 16:9-17:24). He reigned contemporaneously with Asa four years (1 Kings 15:9-10; 16:29) and Jehoshaphat eighteen years (1 Kings 22;41-42).
  • Micaiah and Elijah the Prophets. During the reign of Ahab two distinguished prophets flourished.
    • Micaiah's history is very brief. Ahab formed a military alliance With Jehoshaphat, and they went to war against the king of Syria. Before they went into the battle, Ahab's prophets were Called, and they uttered their predictions concerning the result Of the contest, after which Micaiah was called, and in a very Impressive manner predicted the result of the engagement, and His predictions were fulfilled (2 Chronicles 18:1-34).
    • Elijah is one of the most dramatic characters in history. Both His appearance and departure from the scenes of earthly conflict Are most remarkable. He appeared at a time when idolatry held High carnival in the court of Ahab, and when all Israel had Apparently departed from the Lord (1 Kings 16:29-17:1).

    The chief events in life were,

    • he appeared to Ahab, king of Israel and predicted that there should be neither rain nor dew except by his word (1 Kings 17:1; James 5:17);
    • he was fed by the ravens at the brook Cherith (1 Kings 17:2-7);
    • he arrived at Zarephath and dwelt there (1 Kings 17:8-16);
    • he restored the widow's son (1 Kings 17:17-24);
    • he appeared to Ahab the second time (1 Kings 18:1-19);
    • he repaired the altar of the Lord and destroyed the prophets of Baal (1 Kings 18:20-40);
    • the end of the drought and the race from Carmel to Jezreel (1 Kings 18:41-46);
    • he fled from the anger of Jezebel (1 Kings 19:1-3);
    • he sat down under a juniper tree and prayer for death (1 Kings 19:4);
    • the angel of the Lord appeared, fed, and strengthened him (1 Kings 19:5-8);
    • the Lord spoke to him at Mount Sinai and assured him that there were seven thousand in Israel who had not bowed their knees to Baal (1 Kings 19:9-18);
    • by the Lord's authority he anointed Elisha of Abelmeholah as his successor (1 Kings 19:15-21);
    • he predicted the terrible end of Ahab and his wife (1 Kings 21:17-29);
    • he called fire down from heaven (2 Kings 1:1-12; Luke 9:54);
    • he predicted the death of Ahaziah (2 Kings 1:13-18);
    • he was carried to heaven in a chariot of fire (2 Kings 2:1-18).
  • Ahaziah, the Eighth King. Ahab was succeeded by his son Ahaziah. He followed in the footsteps of his wicked ancestors (1 Kings 22:51-53). An accident befell him, and he was dangerously sick, And he sent to inquire of Baalzebub the god of Ekron if he would Recover. The angel of the Lord commanded Elijah to go and tell the Messengers to declare to the king that he should surely die. When the King recognized the prophet in their description, he sent a deputation Of soldiers requesting him to come to him at once. Disaster followed Disaster until the prophet appeared in the court of the king and Predicted his speedy death (2 Kings 1:1-16). Ahaziah reigned contemporaneously with Jehoshaphat two years (1 Kings 22:42-51; 2 Kings 3:1).
  • Jehoram, the Ninth King. Ahaziah was succeeded by his brother Jehoram (2 Kings 1:17; 3:1). His reign was characterized by evil (2 Kings 3:1-2). The peace of his kingdom was disturbed by the rebellion of the king of Moab. In order to suppress this rebellion he associated With him the king of Judah and the king of Edom. Great destruction and Sorrow followed (2 Kings 3:1-27). He reigned contemporaneously with Jehoshaphat (2 Kings 3:1), Jehoram (1 Kings 22:42; 2 Kings 3:1; 9:29; 2 Chronicles 21:1,5) and Ahaziah (2 Kings 9:29;
  • Elisha the Prophet. Elisha the prophet flourished during these times. The chief events in his life were:
    • he was anointed by Elijah as his successor (1 Kings 19:19-21);
    • he received a double portion of the spirit of Elijah (2 Kings 2:9-15);
    • he told king Jehoram how to obtain water during his campaign against the Moabites (2 Kings 3:10-20);
    • he increased the widow's oil (2 Kings 4:1-7);
    • he raised the Shunammite's son from the dead (2 Kings 4:8-38);
    • he performed a great miracle at Gilgal (2 Kings 4:39-41);
    • he fed a large multitude by a miraculous increase of the food (2 Kings 4:42-44);
    • he healed Naaman's leprosy (2 Kings 5:1-19);
    • he entailed leprosy on the house of Gehazi (2 Kings 5:20-27);
    • the great famine in Samaria (2 Kings 6:1-7);
    • he gave assistance to the king of Israel against his foes (2 Kings 6:8-12);
    • he was captured by the Syrians (2 Kings 6:13-18);
    • he led the Syrians to Samaria, fed them, furnished them with the necessities of life, sent them away, and thus gained a great victory (2 Kings 6:19-24);
    • he predicted sudden plenty, during the famine of Samaria (2 Kings 7:1-2);
    • his prediction was fulfilled (2 Kings 7:3-20);
    • he carried out the commission originally given to Elijah (1 Kings 19:15-18; 2 Kings 8:1-15; 9:1-13).
  • Jehu, the Tenth King--Fifth Dynasty. Jehoram was slain and Succeeded by Jehu, the son of Jehoshaphat, the son of Nimshi. He Inaugurated a reformation by killing Jezebel, the sons of Ahab and the Prophets of Baal (2 Kings 9:1-10:28). Because of his success in the destruction of evil, the Lord promised him that his children should sit Upon the throne for four generations (2 Kings 10:29-34). Jehu reigned over Israel twenty-eight years, and was contemporary with Athaliah seven Years (2 Kings 10:36; 11:1-4) and Jehoash twenty-one years (2 Kings 12:1;
    • Jehoahaz, the Eleventh King. Jehu was succeeded by his son Jehoahaz, who reigned in Samaria seventeen years (2 Kings 18:1). His reign was characterized by a continuance of the idolatrous practice Inaugurated by Jeroboam. The anger of the Lord was kindled against Israel, and He delivered them into the hands of the Syrians. The king Seemed to be penitent but did not reform (2 Kings 12:2-8). He was contemporary with Jehoash seventeen years (2 Kings 12:1; 13:1).
    • Joash, the Twelfth King. Jehoahaz was succeeded by his son Joash, who followed in the footprints of his wicked progenitors. During Elisha's last illness he was visited by Joash to whom he communicated The information that he should smite the Syrians three times (2 Kings 13:14-19). Joash reigned sixteen years, and was contemporary with Jehoash two years (2 Kings 13:9-10; 12:1; 14:1) and Amaziah fourteen years (2 Kings 14:1-2).
    • Jeroboam the Second, the Thirteenth King. Joash was succeeded By his son Jeroboam. He adhered to the ways of his ancestors. He Restored the coast of Israel from the "entering of Hamath unto the sea Of the plain," according to the prediction of Jonah the son of Amittai (2 Kings 14:23-25). Israel was greatly afflicted during these times, but the Lord granted them deliverance by the hand of the king (2 Kings 14:26-27). He reigned forty-one years, and was contemporary with Amaziah fifteen years (2 Kings 14:1-2,23) and Uzziah fourteen years (2 Kings 15:1).
    • Jonah the Prophet. Jonah the prophet flourished during the reign of Jeroboam the Second (2 Kings 14:23-25). The chief events in his life were,
    • he received a commission from the Lord to go unto the great city of Nineveh and cry against it (Jonah 1:1-2); (B) he was cast into the sea and swallowed by a great fish (Jonah 1:3-17);
    • he prayed to the Lord and was delivered (Jonah 2:1-10);
    • the people of Nineveh repented at his preaching (Jonah 4:1-11).
  • Interregnum. There was a space of about twenty-four years Between the death of Jeroboam the Second, and the accession of Zachariah (2 Kings 14:23; 15:1,8).
  • Zachariah, the Fourteenth King. Jeroboam the Second was Succeeded by his son Zachariah in whom was fulfilled the promise of the Lord to Jehu (2 Kings 14:29; 15:8-12). He reigned six months contemporaneously with Uzziah (2 Kings 15:1,2,8).
  • Shallum, the Fifteenth King-- Sixth Dynasty. Zachariah was slain and succeeded by Shallum who reigned a full month, contemporaneously with Uzziah (2 Kings 15:1-2,10,13).
  • Menahem, the Sixteenth King--Seventh Dynasty. Shallum was slain And succeeded by Menahem. His reign was distinguished by a very great Wickedness, war and excessive taxation (2 Kings 15:14-22). He reigned ten years contemporaneously with Uzziah (2 Kings 15:1-2,17).
  • Pekahiah, the Seventeenth King. Menahem was succeeded by his Son Pekahiah. His reign was distinguished on account of wickedness. He Reigned two years contemporaneously with Uzziah (2 Kings 15:1-2,22-24).
  • Pekah, the Eighteenth King--Eighth Dynasty. Pekahiah was slain And succeeded by Pekah (2 Kings 15:25-27). He departed not from the example of his progenitors (2 Kings 15:28). He reigned twenty years (2 Kings 15:27), and was contemporary with Uzziah about one year (2 Kings 15:1-2), Jotham sixteen years (2 Kings 15:32-33; years (2 Kings 16:1).
  • Interregnum. There was an interregnum of about eight years Between the death of Pekah and the accession of Hoshea (2 Kings 15:27; 16:1-2; 17:1).
  • Hoshea, the Nineteenth King--Ninth Dynasty. Pekah was slain and Succeeded by Hoshea (2 Kings 15:30). During the reign of Hoshea, Israel was carried by the Assyrians into captivity, and their country was Occupied by their enemies (2 Kings 17:1-41).


KINGDOM OF JUDAH


  • Rehoboam, the First King. Solomon was succeeded by his son, Rehoboam (1 Kings 12:43). Upon his elevation to the throne a deputation of his countrymen waited upon him, requesting relief from Oppressive taxation. He forsook the counsel of the old men and followed The counsel of the young men, and refused to grant their request (1 Kings 12:1-15; 2 Chronicles 10:1-15). His ungenerous treatment caused ten of the tribes to rebel against his authority. He undertook to suppress the Rebellion, but was warned of God not to make war against his brethren (1 Kings 12:16-24; 2 Chronicles 10:16-19). Rehoboam took up his residence in Jerusalem, built cities and fortified strongholds (2 Chronicles 11:5-12). On account of the apostasy of Jeroboam and Israel, the priests, Levites and other true worshippers remaining in Israel repaired to Jerusalem to worship God, and they therefore strengthened the king (2 Chronicles 11:13-17). Rehoboam had many wives in violation of the law of Moses (Deuteronomy 14:14-18; 2 Chronicles 11:18-23). After he established himself upon the throne, he forsook the law of the Lord and was greatly punished by Shishak, king of Egypt (2 Chronicles 12:1-12). There was war between Jeroboam and Rehoboam continually (1 Kings 15:6). He reigned seventeen years (2 Chronicles 12:13) and was contemporary with Jeroboam (1 Kings 12:1-20; 14:20).
  • Shemaiah the Prophet. Shemaiah, the prophet, flourished during The reign of Rehoboam and communicated to him the command of the Lord Not to go to war against the ten tribes when they rebelled against his Authority (1 Kings 12:22-24).
  • Abijam, the Second King. Rehoboam was succeeded by his son Abijam. He walked in the ways of his father and sinned against God (1 Kings 15:1-5. The war that had begun between the two kingdoms was continued during the reign of Abijam, and finally resulted in the Defeat of Jeroboam (2 Chronicles 13:1-20). During the latter part of Abijam's reign he waxed fat and married fourteen wives (2 Chronicles 13:21-22). He reigned three years contemporaneously with Jeroboam (1 Kings 14:20; 15:1-2).
  • Asa, the Third King. Abijam was succeeded by his son Asa (1 Kings 15:8). Immediately upon his accession to the throne he inaugurated a reformation; he removed the sodomites out of the Land; he removed all the idols his father had made; he removed his Mother from being queen, and destroyed her idol. His heart was perfect Toward the Lord, and the things his father had dedicated, he brought Into the house of the Lord (1 Kings 15:9-15). There was war between Asa and Baasha, and success seemed to attend Baasha for a time, but finally Asa induced Benhadad to make a league with him which resulted in favor Of Asa (1 Kings 15:16-22). Asa greatly improved his military equipments, and greatly increased the army (2 Chronicles 14:1-8). He gained a victory over the mighty host of Zerah the Ethiopian (2 Chronicles 14:9-15). After this victory he was met by the servant of God who strengthened and Encouraged him (2 Chronicles 15:1-7). He was also greatly encouraged by Oded, the prophet, and, as a result of his words, pushed his reforms and Gathered his people together at Jerusalem, where many sacrifices were Offered and a covenant entered into to seek and serve the Lord (2 Chronicles 15:8-19). Asa was severely rebuked by Hanani because he had relied on the Syrians to assist him in war. The prophet assured him That in this he had done foolishly, for the eyes of the Lord run to and Fro throughout the earth in order to show Himself strong in behalf of Those whose hearts are perfect toward Him. The king was angry at the Seer and imprisoned him, and he also oppressed some of the people (2 Chronicles 16:7-10). Asa's closing years were clouded by disease and sorrow; he sought the physicians and not the Lord, and he slept With his fathers, and his countrymen buried him with distinguished Honors in the city of David (2 Chronicles 16:11-14). Asa reigned forty-one years (2 Kings 15:8-10), and was contemporary with seven of the kings of Israel:
    • Jeroboam two years (1 Kings 14:20, 31; 15:1-2; 2 Chronicles 12:13);
    • Nadab, two years (1 Kings 14:20; 15:25);
    • Baasha, twenty-four years (1 Kings 15:33);
    • Elah, two years (1 Kings 16:8);
    • Zimri, seven days (1 Kings 16:8-10, 15);
    • Omri, six years (1 Kings 16:23,28-29);
    • Ahab, three years (1 Kings 16:29).
  • Azariah, Oded, and Hanani the Prophets. The prophets Azariah (2 Chronicles 15:1-2), Oded (2 Chronicles 15:8; flourished during the reign of Asa (2 Chronicles 15:1-8; 16:7-10).
  • Jehoshaphat, the Fourth King. Asa was succeeded by his son Jehoshaphat (1 Kings 15:24). He continued the work inaugurated by his father by fortifying the land and destroying the remains of idolatrous Worship. He also appointed Levites to go throughout the cities of the Country and teach the people the law of the Lord (2 Chronicles 17:1-9). Fear fell upon the surrounding nations and Jehoshaphat's reign was one of Peace (2 Chronicles 17:10). He assisted Ahab in a campaign against Ramothgilead, which resulted in the death of the king of Israel (2 Chronicles 18:1-34). The latter part of his reign was distinguished by,
    • the rebuke of the prophet on account of his association with the ungodly king of Israel;
    • the inauguration of numerous reforms for the benefit of the people (2 Chronicles 19:1-11);
    • a great victory over his enemies;
    • peace and unfortunate commercial operations (2 Chronicles 20:1-37).

    Jehoshaphat reigned twenty-five years (2 Chronicles 20:31), and was contemporary with Ahab seventeen years (1 Kings 16:29; 22:41,50-51), Ahaziah two years (1 Kings 22:51), Jehoram six years (2 Kings 3:1;

  • Jehu and Jahaziel the Prophets. The prophets Jehu, the son of Hanani (2 Chronicles 19:1-3), and Jahaziel flourished during the reign of Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 20:14-17).
  • Jehoram, the Fifth King. Jehoshaphat was succeeded by his son Jehoram (2 Chronicles 21:1). His reign was characterized by murder, war, devastation and great trouble, and his departure caused not regret (2 Chronicles 21:1-20). He reigned eight years (2 Chronicles 21:1, 5; contemporary with Jehoram, king of Israel (1 Kings 22:42; 2 Kings 3:1; 9:29).
  • Ahaziah, the Sixth King. Jehoram was succeeded by Ahaziah. His Reign was distinguished on account of his wickedness (2 Chronicles 22:1-4). He went to Jezreel to visit Joram, king of Israel, who had been wounded in War with the Syrians, where he was slain by Jehu, the son of Nimshi (2 Chronicles 22:5-9). Ahaziah reigned contemporaneously with Jehoram one year (2 Kings 3:1; 8:24-26).
  • Athaliah, the Usurper. As soon as the mother of Ahaziah Discovered that he was dead, she attempted to destroy all the royal Seed, and succeeded him as king (2 Kings 11:1-3; 2 Chronicles 22:10-12). She reigned contemporaneously with Jehu about six years (2 Kings 9:1-12; 10:36; 11:1-4).
  • Jehoash, the Seventh King. Athaliah was succeeded Jehoash, the son of Ahaziah. He was saved at the time of the Destruction of the royal seed, by Jehosheba, and kept in concealment For six years (2 Kings 11:1-3). In the seventh year, led by Jehoiada, the priest, the people made him king and slew Athaliah (2 Kings 11:4-16). At his coronation the people destroyed and broke down the house of Baal, destroyed idols and slew the idolatrous priest (2 Kings 11:17-21). The young king, under the instruction of Jehoiada, the priest, honored The Lord (2 Kings 12:1-2). The most important event in the reign of Jehoash was the repairing of the house of the Lord (2 Kings 12:4-18; 2 Chronicles 24:1-4). After the death of Jehoiada, the people and king departed from the Lord. The Lord sent prophets to them, but they would Not hear. Zechariah, the son of Jehoiada, was stoned to death (2 Chronicles 24:15-22). The closing years of his reign were characterized by suffering and sorrow, and he was finally assassinated by his own Servants (2 Kings 12:20-21; 2 Chronicles 24:23-26). Jehoash reigned forty years (2 Kings 12:1). He was contemporary with Jehu about twenty-one years (2 Kings 10:36; 12:1), Jehoahaz seventeen years (2 Kings 13:1; about two years (2 Kings 13:10).
  • Zechariah the Prophet. Zechariah, the son of Jehoiada, the Prophet, flourished during the reign of Jehoash (2 Chronicles 24:15-22).
  • Amaziah, the Eighth King. Jehoash was succeeded by his son Amaziah (2 Chronicles 24:27). Amaziah's reign was a mixture of good and evil, but the evil finally triumphed. He made great military Preparations and defeated the Edomites in battle. Subsequently he Challenged the king of Israel to war and was ingloriously defeated (2 Chronicles 25:1-28). Amaziah reigned twenty-nine years (2 Kings 12:19-21; 14:1-2). He was contemporary with Joash fourteen years (2 Kings 13:10; 14:1-2) and Jeroboam the Second fifteen years (2 Kings 14:23).
  • Interregnum. There was an interregnum of twelve years between The death of Amaziah and the succession of Uzziah (2 Kings 14:1-2,23; 15:1-2).
  • Azariah or Uzziah, the Ninth King. Amaziah was succeeded by his Son Uzziah. His reign was similar to his predecessors. He had a large Standing army, and was successful in war because the Lord helped him (2 Chronicles 26:1-15). On account of his great success he became disobedient to the law of God, and attempted to perform the duties of Priest, and the Lord sent upon him the terrible disease of leprosy (2 Chronicles 26:16-21). Uzziah reigned fifty-two years (2 Kings 15:1-2; 2 Chronicles 26:1, 3). He was contemporary Jeroboam the Second fourteen years (2 Kings 14:3; 15:1-2), Zachariah six months (2 Kings 15:8; month (2 Kings 15:13), Menahem ten years (2 Kings 15:23; one year (2 Kings 15:27).
  • Amos and Joel the Prophets. The prophet Amos flourished during The reigns of Uzziah king of Judah and Jeroboam the Second, king of Israel (Amos 1:1). It is thought that the prophet Joel also flourished about this time (Joel 1:1). The most important prophecy of Joel is that which relates to the beginning of the gospel (Joel 2:28-32; Acts 2:1-41).
  • Jotham, the Tenth King. Uzziah was succeeded by his son Jotham, Whose reign was distinguished by internal improvements and a successful Contest with the Ammonites. His success is attributed to his fidelity to The Lord his God (2 Chronicles 27:1-7). Jotham reigned sixteen years contemporaneously with Pekah (2 Kings 15:27, 32-33).
  • Ahaz, the Eleventh King. Jotham was succeeded by his son Ahaz, Whose reign was distinguished by the most appalling acts of wickedness Known to the history of Judah (2 Chronicles 28:1-27). Ahaz reigned sixteen years (2 Kings 16:1-2). He was contemporary with Pekah four years (2 Kings 15:27; 16:1) and Hoshea four years (2 Kings 17:1;
  • Hezekiah, the Twelfth King. Ahaz was succeeded by his son Hezekiah (2 Kings 18:1). He followed in the footprints of his father David (2 Kings 18:1-3). His reign was distinguished for,
    • the destruction of high places, images, groves and the brazen serpent Moses had made (2 Kings 18:4);
    • the opening of the house of the Lord (2 Chronicles 29:1-18);
    • the subjugation of the Philistines (2 Kings 18:8);
    • the captivity of Israel (2 Kings 18:9-12);
    • the comfort brought him by Isaiah the son of Amoz when he was greatly troubled on account of the threats of Rabshakeh the servant of the king of Assyria, and the final throwing off of the Assyrian yoke by the destruction of the army by the Angel of the Lord (2 Kings 18:13-37; 19:1-37);
    • his miraculous restoration to health--the backward movement of the shadow on the dial (2 Kings 20:1-11);
    • his mistake in showing his treasures to the ambassadors of the king of Babylon (2 Kings 20:12-19);
    • the keeping of the passover of the Lord (2 Chronicles 30:1-27);
    • he fortified and improved Jerusalem (2 Chronicles 32:1-31).

    Hezekiah reigned twenty-nine years (2 Kings 18:1-2), and was contemporary with Hoshea about six years (2 Kings 17:1; 18:1-2).

  • Isaiah, Hosea, Micah and Nahum the Prophets. The prophets Isaiah, Hoshea, Micah and Nahum flourished during the reigns of the Last three or four kings (Isaiah 1:1; Hosea 1:1; Micah 1:1; Nahum 1:1). The chief events in the life of Isaiah were
    • the beginning of his public ministry in the days of Uzziah, king of Judah, by the denunciation of the wickedness of Judah and Israel (Isaiah 1:1-31);
    • he predicted that the word of the Lord should go out from Jerusalem, and that finally the nations would beat their implements of war into implements of peace and learn war no more (Isaiah 2:1-4);
    • his vision of the glory of God (Isaiah 6:1-12);
    • he comforted Ahaz, the king of Judah, and assured him that a virgin should conceive and bring forth a son whose name should be Immanuel (Isaiah 7:1-16);
    • he predicted the birth of Jesus Christ and the triumphs of his kingdom (Isaiah 9:1-7);
    • he predicted the gathering again of Israel (Isaiah 10:20-27; 11:11-16; 14:1-3);
    • he predicted the downfall of Babylon (Isaiah 13:1-22);
    • he predicted the destruction of Moab (Isaiah 15:1-9; 16:1-14);
    • he predicted the downfall of Damascus (Isaiah 17:1-3);
    • he predicted the downfall of Egypt (Isaiah 19:1-25);
    • he comforted Hezekiah, and predicted the overthrow of the Assyrians (2 Kings 19:6-37; Isaiah 37:6-38);
    • his prediction respecting the sickness and restoration of Hezekiah and the sign given him (2 Kings 20:1-11; Isaiah 38:1-8);
    • he condemned Hezekiah for showing his treasures to the ambassadors of the king of Babylon and predicted the captivity of the people of Judah (2 Kings 20:12-19; Isaiah 39:1-8);
    • he predicted the coming of the harbinger of the Lord (Isaiah 40:1-8);
    • he predicted the restoration of the captives and the rebuilding of the temple under Cyrus (Isaiah 44:28; 45:1-13);
    • he predicted the humiliation and sufferings of the Messiah (Isaiah 53:1-12);
    • he predicted the call of the Gentiles (Isaiah 54:1-4; 60:1-11);
    • he heard with prophetic ear the glorious invitation of the gospel (Isaiah 55:1-5; Matthew 11:28-30);
    • he predicted the giving of the new name (Isaiah 62:1-4; Acts 11:1-26);
    • he described the conquering march of the Messiah (Isaiah 63:1-9).

    The most important feature of Hosea's prophecy is his denunciation of the sins of his countrymen and the cause of all their troubles--the lack of knowledge (Hosea 4:1-6).

    Micah

    • predicted the proclamation of the word of the Lord from Jerusalem and the destruction of the implements of war (Micah 4:1-5)
    • and also predicted the birth of Messiah at Bethlehem (Micah 5:2).

    Nahum predicted the destruction of Nineveh (Nahum 1:1-3:19).

  • Manasseh, the Thirteenth King. Hezekiah was succeeded by his Son Manasseh (2 Kings 20:21). The early part of this reign was distinguished by the restoration of the idolatrous practice that had Been destroyed by Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 33:1-10). As a punishment the Lord allowed the king of Assyria to carry Manasseh a prisoner in fetters Into Babylon. During his sojourn there he became humble in sight of God To his throne, and the latter part of his reign was an honor to himself And the Lord (2 Chronicles 33:11-20). Manasseh reigned fifty-five years (2 Kings 21:1).
  • Amon, the Fourteenth King. Manasseh was succeeded by his son Amon, who reigned in wickedness two years (2 Kings 21:18-22; 2 Chronicles 33:20-24).
  • Josiah, the Fifteenth King. Amon was succeeded by his son Josiah (2 Kings 21:26). Many years before his birth, the prophet of the Lord had predicted that he would be a reformer (2 Kings 13:1-2). Josiah lived and worked in strict obedience to the law of God. In the Eighteenth year of his reign, he began to repair the house of the Lord. During the work Hilkiah, the priest, discovered the book of the law and Shaphan, the scribe, read it before the king, who, upon hearing it, Expressed with great emphasis his sorrow over the condition of Israel And his fear of the judgments of God. The Lord however gave him Assurance that he should live and die in peace (2 Kings 22:3-20). After this Josiah pushed the work of reformation with great zeal and Success, and he finally destroyed that altar at Bethel and burned the Bones of the priests according to the predictions of the Prophet (2 Kings 23:1-20). After the land had been purged of idolatry, Josiah kept the feast of the passover (2 Chronicles 35:1-19). Josiah was killed in a battle with Pharaoh Necho, the king of Egypt, and he was buried in Jerusalem amid great mourning and lamentation (2 Kings 23:29-30; 2 Chronicles 35:20-27), Josiah reigned thirty-one years (2 Kings 21:26; 22:1;
  • Zephaniah and Habakkuk the Prophets. The prophet Zephaniah Flourished during Josiah's reign (Zephaniah 1:1); and it is thought that Habakkuk flourished also at this time (Habakkuk 1:1).
  • Jehoahaz, the Sixteenth King. The people of the land made Jehoahaz king in his father's place. He reigned three months after Which he was dethroned by the king of Egypt (2 Chronicles 36:1-3).
  • Jehoiakim, the Seventeenth King. Jehoahaz was succeeded by Jehoiakim, whose wicked reign lasted eleven years. He was finally taken Into captivity by Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon (2 Chronicles 36:5-8).
  • Jehoiachin, the Eighteenth King. Jehoiakim was succeeded by Jehoiachin, whose wicked reign lasted three months and ten days, after Which he was carried into captivity by the king of Babylon (2 Chronicles 36:9-10).
  • Zedekiah, the Nineteenth King. Jehoiachin was succeeded by His brother Zedekiah, who reigned in wickedness eleven years. He made a Unsuccessful attempt to throw off the Babylonish yoke. The corruptions That had prevailed for centuries culminated in the destruction of The house of the Lord and the captivity of his people (2 Chronicles 36:11-21).
  • Jeremiah and Obadiah the Prophets. The prophets Jeremiah and Probably Obadiah flourished during the closing years of the kingdom of Judah (Jeremiah 1:1-3; Obadiah 1:1). The chief events of the life of Jeremiah were,
    • he was called to the prophetic office in the days of Josiah (Jeremiah 1:1-2);
    • he denounced Jerusalem and Judah on account of their sins (Jeremiah 2:1-37; 3:1-10);
    • he announced to the people the Lord's willingness to receive them if they would repent (Jeremiah 3:11-25);
    • he was cast into prison by Pashur (Jeremiah 20:1-2);
    • he announced to Zedekiah his impending doom (Jeremiah 21:1-10);
    • he predicted the coming of a righteous king (Jeremiah 23:5-6);
    • he foretold the seventy years' captivity (Jeremiah 25:11-12);
    • he fled from Jehoiakim to Egypt (Jeremiah 26:12-21);
    • he condemned the false prophet Hananiah (Jeremiah 28:1-16);
    • he predicted the restoration of Judah and Israel (Jeremiah 30:1-3);
    • he predicted the establishment of a new covenant (Jeremiah 31:31-34);
    • he was imprisoned by Zedekiah (Jeremiah 32:1-12);
    • he predicted the captivity of Zedekiah (Jeremiah 34:1-7);
    • his rescue from the dungeon by Ebedmelech (Jeremiah 38:1-13);
    • the downfall of Jerusalem according to his own prediction (2 Chronicles 36:11-21; Jeremiah 39:1-10);
    • he was kindly treated by Nebuzaradan (Jeremiah 39:11-14; 40:1-5);
    • he departed into Egypt with a few of his countrymen (Jeremiah 43:5-7);
    • he predicted the overthrow of Egypt by the king of Babylon, and the destruction of all the jews who went into Egypt except a small remnant (Jeremiah 43:8-13; 44:1-28);
    • he predicted the downfall of Babylon (Jeremiah 50:1-46; 51:1-64).

    The burden of the prophecy of Obadiah was against Edom (Obadiah 1:1-21).



KINGDOM OR CHURCH OF CHRIST, THE


  • Prophecies Concerning It.
    • Isaiah and Micah predicted that the law should go forth out of Zion and the word of the Lord from Jerusalem (Isaiah 2:1-3; Micah 4:1-3);
    • Jeremiah predicted that the Lord would establish a new covenant with the house of Israel and the house of Judah, that it should not be like unto the covenant that He made with their fathers when he brought them out of Egypt, that He would put His laws in their minds and write them in their hearts, that they would know the Lord and that their sins and iniquities should be remembered against them no more (Jeremiah 31:31-34; Hebrews 8:7-13);
    • and Daniel predicted that the God of heaven would set up a kingdom that should never be destroyed and that it should consume and break in pieces all other kingdoms, and stand forever (Daniel 2:44).
  • Foundation. Isaiah predicted that a foundation stone should be laid in Zion (Isaiah 28:16), and that stone is Christ (Matthew 16:13-20; Romans 9:32-33; 1 Corinthians 3:10-11; Ephesians 2:19-22; 1 Peter 1:6-8).
  • Head. Jesus Christ is the head of the Church (Colossians 1:18; Ephesians 5:23).
  • The Beginning. In contemplating this subject, we should note the general drift of the Bible teaching prior to the death of Christ:
    • It was in the future when God made promises to Abraham (Genesis 12:1-3), to Isaac (Genesis 26:1-5; 28:10-14); it was in the future when Jacob prophesied of the coming of Shiloh (Genesis 49:1, 8-10; Hebrews 2:14; Revelation 1:1-5); it was in the future when Moses predicted the coming of One whose authority should be supreme (Deuteronomy 18:15-18); it was in the future when Isaiah predicted the bringing in of the Gentiles (Isaiah 54:1-3; 62:1-4); it was in the future when John the Baptist preached in the wilderness of Judea (Matthew 3:1-13); it was in the future when Jesus announced to His disciples that some of them would live to see it come with power (Mark 9:1); it was in the future when Jesus visited Caesarea Philippi (Matthew 16:13-17); it was in the future, near the close of the earthly life of Jesus, for the disciples were expecting it to immediately appear (Luke 19:11-27); it was in the future when Jesus was on the cross (Luke 23:42-43); it was in the future after the death of Jesus on the cross (Mark 15:43); it was in the future, just preceding the ascension (Acts 1:6-7).
    • Previous to Pentecost the Church or Kingdom is spoken of as in the future, but after that day it is spoken of as having an actual existence (Acts 2:41; 5:11; 8:1; Hebrews 12:28). It was necessary to abolish the first institution in order to establish the second (Hebrews 10:9): but the first was not removed during the life of Jesus, for He commanded His disciples to follow the teaching of the law as expounded by the Scribes and Pharisees (Matthew 23:1-3), and the vail of the temple was not rent in twain until He expired (Matthew 27:51; Ephesians 2:13-16).
    • The new institution was to be characterized by the absolute blotting out of sins (Jeremiah 31:31-34), and as the blood of animal sacrifices could never take away sin, it was indispensably necessary for Christ to die before the work could be done (Matthew 26:28; Romans 5:9; Hebrews 9:14-22; 10:4; 1 Peter 1:18-19).
    • The church was purchased by Jesus and was not His until He paid the price (Matthew 20:28; 1 Corinthians 6:19-20).
    • The body could not exist without the spirit (1 Corinthians 6:19-20; James 2:26) and the Spirit was not given until the glorification of the Lord (John 7:38-39; Acts 1:5).
    • The prophets, Jesus Christ and His apostles agree in placing the beginning at Jerusalem (Psalms 110:1-4; Isaiah 2:1-3; 62:1-2; Joel 2:28-32; Micah 4:1-2; Luke 24:45-53; Acts 1:5-8; 2:1-47; 8:1; Galatians 4:21-31).

    The work was inaugurated on the first Pentecost after the ascension of Christ. This day is distinguished from all others in the world's history:

    • The disciples received their first message from Jesus after His departure (Luke 24:50-53; Acts 2:36);
    • the Holy Spirit came into the world and began through the apostles the evangelization of the world (John 14:16-18; 16:7-11; Acts 2:1-4);
    • the prophecies were fulfilled on that day (Isaiah 2:1-3; Psalms 110:1-4; Joel 2:28-32; Micah 4:1-2; Acts 2:1-47);
    • Peter and the other apostles began to bind and loose in the name of Jesus (Matthew 16:18; 18:18; Acts 2:37-38);
    • the apostles proclaimed a law of remission in the name of Jesus (Matthew 28:18-20; Acts 2:37);
    • the apostles did their first preaching under the last and great commission (Mark 16:15-16; Acts 2:14-36).
  • The Law of Admission. In general terms, the law of admission into the Church is the gospel, but conditions are specifically laid down in it by the Lord and His inspired apostles. The gospel may be divided and studied,
    • in promise (Genesis 12:1-3; Galatians 3:16);
    • in prophecy (Genesis 49:10; Isaiah 7:14);
    • in preparation (Isaiah 40:1-8; Matthew 3:1-12);
    • and in fact (Mark 4:26-28; 1 Corinthians 15:1-3).

    These condition to the alien are:

    • Faith,
      • its importance (Hebrews 11:6);
      • it is taking God at His word (Romans 4:21);
      • its unity (Ephesians 4:5-13);
      • its basis is Jesus Christ (John 8:24; 1 Corinthians 3:10-11);
      • it is produced by hearing the gospel (John 20:30-31; Romans 10:17);
      • it purifies the heart (Acts 15:9);
      • and its effect on the life (James 2:17-26).
    • Repentance,
      • God is willing for men to repent (Ezekiel 18:25-32[ 2 Peter 3:9);
      • men can repent, for salvation depends on it (Luke 13:1-5);
      • the motives that produce it are the goodness of God (Romans 2:4), and the fear of judgment (Acts 17:30-31; 2 Corinthians 7:10);
      • it is a change of mind resulting in a change or reformation of life (Isaiah 55:7; 7:5; Matthew 3:7; James 3:7-10).
    • Confession,
      • men are required to confess Christ (Matthew 10:32-33);
      • it is done with the mouth unto salvation (Romans 10:9-10);
      • and in the presence of witnesses (John 12:42; Acts 19:18; 1 Timothy 6:12-14).
    • Baptism,
      • the subject--believers in Christ;
      • the action--a burial;
      • the design--for the remission of sins (Matthew 3:14-17; 28:18-20; Mark 16:15-16; John 3:5; Acts 2:38; Romans 6:1-3; 1 Corinthians 12:13; Galatians 3:26-27; Ephesians 4:5; 5:26; Colossians 2:12; Hebrews 10:22; 1 Peter 3:21).
  • The Life. Every member of the body of Christ is required to Live righteously, soberly and godly in the present world (Titus 2:11-14), adding to his faith courage, knowledge, temperance, patient, godliness, brotherly kindness, charity (2 Peter 1:5-7).
  • The Assembly. The ancient Christians assembled on the first day of the week to,
    • break bread (Acts 20:7);
    • and contribute to the Lord's cause as He had prospered them (1 Corinthians 16:1-2).
  • Name of the Church. In New Testament times the Church was called the Church of Christ (Romans 16:16) or the Church of God (1 Corinthians 1:1-2;
  • Names of the Members. The members of the Church of Christ were called, individually,
    • saints (Romans 1:7);
    • children of God (Romans 8:16);
    • heirs of God (Romans 8:16);
    • brethren (Romans 12:1);
    • sons of God (1 John 3:2);
    • disciples;
    • and Christians (Acts 11:26; 1 Peter 4:16).
  • Early History. The early history of the Church is the history Of triumph. The apostles began their labors in Jerusalem and in a very Short time a very great number of people had yielded to the Demands of Christ in Jerusalem and the surrounding country (Acts 2:37-42; 4:1-4; 5:14; 6:7). Soon Philip, the evangelist, introduced the gospels in the city of Samaria with great success (Acts 8:1-25), and Peter introduced it among the Gentiles at the house of Cornelius (Acts 10:1-48; 11:1-26).


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